5 ways to avoid craptastic business writing

At business school, we played a silly game called buzzword bingo. Before a professor arrived, students chipped in a buck in exchange for a bingo card with words like “value-added”, “synergy”, “seemless” and “share of mind”. When a student mentioned your word in class discussions, you circled it on your card. If you got enough words for bingo, you raised your hand, and made a comment incorporating an embarrassing phrase that pays, like “I read this (homework) on the toilet…”. Back then, it was just a juvenile way to amuse ourselves and bug the professors. But the undertone was on-target: Showing people how silly they sound when they use buzzwords.

Overuse of buzzwords are just one example of ways people muck up their business writing. Here are a few tips:

1) Stop following the herd. In “Why Is Business Writing So Awful?” Jason Fried argues that phrases like “full-service solutions provider” and “value-added services” are overused to the point of being generic. “A quick search on Google finds at least 47,000 companies describing themselves as full-service solutions providers…,” explains Fried. “When you write like everyone else and sound like everyone else and act like everyone else, you’re saying, ‘Our products are like everyone else’s, too.’ ”

2) Write for your target readers. Fried cites an example of a company that does this well. Woot.com sells cool stuff cheap. Here’s an excerpt from their FAQ page….. Question: “Will I receive customer support like I’m used to?” Answer: “No… If you buy something you don’t end up liking…. sell it on eBay. It’s likely you’ll make money doing this and save everyone a hassle.” Woot isn’t trying to be all things to all people. They’d rather come off as honest and direct, which their core customers appreciate, at the risk of alienating others.

3) Avoid useless modifiers. Frances Cole Jones, an author and media coach, explains this well. Words like “amazing” and “great” are too vague to be helpful. Others, like “we’re the leader in the market” must be backed up with facts, or they can backfire.

4) Word to your mother. Imagine that your mom will read what you are writing. Would she understand what you mean? If not, simplify and clarify.

5) Size matters. Don’t use ten words if you can use five. Write in short sentences. They are easier to read. Get it?

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